Standard

Helping poor readers demonstrate their science competence : Item characteristics supporting text–picture integration. / Saß, Steffani; Schütte, Kerstin.

in: Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, Band 34, Nr. 1, 02.2016, S. 91-96.

Publikation: Forschung - BegutachtungZeitschriftenaufsätze

Harvard

Saß, S & Schütte, K 2016, 'Helping poor readers demonstrate their science competence: Item characteristics supporting text–picture integration' Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, Bd 34, Nr. 1, S. 91-96. DOI: 10.1177/0734282915588389

APA

Saß, S., & Schütte, K. (2016). Helping poor readers demonstrate their science competence: Item characteristics supporting text–picture integration. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 34(1), 91-96. DOI: 10.1177/0734282915588389

Vancouver

Saß S, Schütte K. Helping poor readers demonstrate their science competence: Item characteristics supporting text–picture integration. Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment. 2016 Feb;34(1):91-96. Erhältlich von, DOI: 10.1177/0734282915588389

BibTeX

@article{fcdfa5d7551e4622a3183df6a81f439c,
title = "Helping poor readers demonstrate their science competence: Item characteristics supporting text–picture integration",
abstract = "Solving test items might require abilities in test-takers other than the construct the test was designed to assess. Item and student characteristics such as item format or reading comprehension can impact the test result. This experiment is based on cognitive theories of text and picture comprehension. It examines whether integration aids, which relate pictorial representations to the corresponding textual representations in item stimuli, affect performance in a science test. The results show that items containing referential connections between both representations and highlighting associated information are easier to solve than non-integrated items (i.e., items without aids). However, this is only true for information-complementary representations, not for information-equivalent representations. Furthermore, an effect of reading comprehension on students’ test performance observed when complementary information was presented in a non-integrated format was absent in the integrated format condition.",
keywords = "Educational assessment/measurements, standardized assessment, educational assessment, text–picture integration, test fairness, item characteristics",
author = "Steffani Saß and Kerstin Schütte",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1177/0734282915588389",
volume = "34",
pages = "91--96",
journal = "Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Helping poor readers demonstrate their science competence

T2 - Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment

AU - Saß,Steffani

AU - Schütte,Kerstin

PY - 2016/2

Y1 - 2016/2

N2 - Solving test items might require abilities in test-takers other than the construct the test was designed to assess. Item and student characteristics such as item format or reading comprehension can impact the test result. This experiment is based on cognitive theories of text and picture comprehension. It examines whether integration aids, which relate pictorial representations to the corresponding textual representations in item stimuli, affect performance in a science test. The results show that items containing referential connections between both representations and highlighting associated information are easier to solve than non-integrated items (i.e., items without aids). However, this is only true for information-complementary representations, not for information-equivalent representations. Furthermore, an effect of reading comprehension on students’ test performance observed when complementary information was presented in a non-integrated format was absent in the integrated format condition.

AB - Solving test items might require abilities in test-takers other than the construct the test was designed to assess. Item and student characteristics such as item format or reading comprehension can impact the test result. This experiment is based on cognitive theories of text and picture comprehension. It examines whether integration aids, which relate pictorial representations to the corresponding textual representations in item stimuli, affect performance in a science test. The results show that items containing referential connections between both representations and highlighting associated information are easier to solve than non-integrated items (i.e., items without aids). However, this is only true for information-complementary representations, not for information-equivalent representations. Furthermore, an effect of reading comprehension on students’ test performance observed when complementary information was presented in a non-integrated format was absent in the integrated format condition.

KW - Educational assessment/measurements

KW - standardized assessment

KW - educational assessment

KW - text–picture integration

KW - test fairness

KW - item characteristics

U2 - 10.1177/0734282915588389

DO - 10.1177/0734282915588389

M3 - Journal articles

VL - 34

SP - 91

EP - 96

JO - Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment

JF - Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 555354