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We are in this together : Dyadic patterns of self-esteem in late-life couples. / Wagner, Jenny; Voelkle, Manuel C.; Hoppmann, Christiane; Luszcz, Mary A.; Gerstorf, Denis.

in: International Journal of Behavioral Development, Band 42, Nr. 1, 01.01.2018, S. 34-42.

Publikation: Forschung - BegutachtungZeitschriftenaufsätze

Harvard

Wagner, J, Voelkle, MC, Hoppmann, C, Luszcz, MA & Gerstorf, D 2018, 'We are in this together: Dyadic patterns of self-esteem in late-life couples' International Journal of Behavioral Development, Bd 42, Nr. 1, S. 34-42. DOI: 10.1177/0165025416679742

APA

Wagner, J., Voelkle, M. C., Hoppmann, C., Luszcz, M. A., & Gerstorf, D. (2018). We are in this together: Dyadic patterns of self-esteem in late-life couples. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 42(1), 34-42. DOI: 10.1177/0165025416679742

Vancouver

Wagner J, Voelkle MC, Hoppmann C, Luszcz MA, Gerstorf D. We are in this together: Dyadic patterns of self-esteem in late-life couples. International Journal of Behavioral Development. 2018 Jan 1;42(1):34-42. Erhältlich von, DOI: 10.1177/0165025416679742

BibTeX

@article{25047d7900274d4db4ed1948926863ec,
title = "We are in this together: Dyadic patterns of self-esteem in late-life couples",
abstract = "Lifespan theoretical notions have long acknowledged that regulative capacities of the self are relatively robust well into old age. This general trend notwithstanding, people often differ substantially throughout life in their levels of and change trajectories in self-esteem. One prime contributing factor may be perceptions of social inclusion. Because functioning and development in many domains of life are often linked across partners, we examine whether and how self-esteem and its late-life change are intertwined between long-term married partners. To do so, we make use of six occasions over 18-year longitudinal data from 382 married couples in the Australian Longitudinal Study of Aging (Mage = 75 years at baseline, SD = 5.3, range 65–91). Applying SEM-based continuous time panel models revealed that discrete time autoregressive effects, which capture the stability of self-esteem, were declining over time. Most important for our question, across-partner (cross-lagged) effects indicated substantial differences between spouses such that change in husbands’ self-esteem predicts subsequent changes in the wives’ self-esteem, but not vice versa. We discuss potential conditions and challenges of dyadic associations in how late-life self-esteem and its change are intertwined between partners.",
keywords = "Development of competences and transitions, continuous time modeling, dyadic (couple) models, late life, longitudinal data, self-esteem change",
author = "Jenny Wagner and Voelkle, {Manuel C.} and Christiane Hoppmann and Luszcz, {Mary A.} and Denis Gerstorf",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0165025416679742",
volume = "42",
pages = "34--42",
journal = "International Journal of Behavioral Development",
issn = "0165-0254",
publisher = "SAGE Publisher",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - We are in this together

T2 - International Journal of Behavioral Development

AU - Wagner,Jenny

AU - Voelkle,Manuel C.

AU - Hoppmann,Christiane

AU - Luszcz,Mary A.

AU - Gerstorf,Denis

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Lifespan theoretical notions have long acknowledged that regulative capacities of the self are relatively robust well into old age. This general trend notwithstanding, people often differ substantially throughout life in their levels of and change trajectories in self-esteem. One prime contributing factor may be perceptions of social inclusion. Because functioning and development in many domains of life are often linked across partners, we examine whether and how self-esteem and its late-life change are intertwined between long-term married partners. To do so, we make use of six occasions over 18-year longitudinal data from 382 married couples in the Australian Longitudinal Study of Aging (Mage = 75 years at baseline, SD = 5.3, range 65–91). Applying SEM-based continuous time panel models revealed that discrete time autoregressive effects, which capture the stability of self-esteem, were declining over time. Most important for our question, across-partner (cross-lagged) effects indicated substantial differences between spouses such that change in husbands’ self-esteem predicts subsequent changes in the wives’ self-esteem, but not vice versa. We discuss potential conditions and challenges of dyadic associations in how late-life self-esteem and its change are intertwined between partners.

AB - Lifespan theoretical notions have long acknowledged that regulative capacities of the self are relatively robust well into old age. This general trend notwithstanding, people often differ substantially throughout life in their levels of and change trajectories in self-esteem. One prime contributing factor may be perceptions of social inclusion. Because functioning and development in many domains of life are often linked across partners, we examine whether and how self-esteem and its late-life change are intertwined between long-term married partners. To do so, we make use of six occasions over 18-year longitudinal data from 382 married couples in the Australian Longitudinal Study of Aging (Mage = 75 years at baseline, SD = 5.3, range 65–91). Applying SEM-based continuous time panel models revealed that discrete time autoregressive effects, which capture the stability of self-esteem, were declining over time. Most important for our question, across-partner (cross-lagged) effects indicated substantial differences between spouses such that change in husbands’ self-esteem predicts subsequent changes in the wives’ self-esteem, but not vice versa. We discuss potential conditions and challenges of dyadic associations in how late-life self-esteem and its change are intertwined between partners.

KW - Development of competences and transitions

KW - continuous time modeling

KW - dyadic (couple) models

KW - late life

KW - longitudinal data

KW - self-esteem change

U2 - 10.1177/0165025416679742

DO - 10.1177/0165025416679742

M3 - Journal articles

VL - 42

SP - 34

EP - 42

JO - International Journal of Behavioral Development

JF - International Journal of Behavioral Development

SN - 0165-0254

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 672862