Standard

Cross-cultural differences in academic self-efficacy and its sources across socialization contexts. / Gebauer, Miriam M.; McElvany, Nele; Koeller, Olaf; Schoeber, Christian.

In: Social Psychology of Education, 02.09.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

Gebauer, M. M., McElvany, N., Koeller, O., & Schoeber, C. (2021). Cross-cultural differences in academic self-efficacy and its sources across socialization contexts. Social Psychology of Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11218-021-09658-3

Vancouver

Author

Gebauer, Miriam M. ; McElvany, Nele ; Koeller, Olaf ; Schoeber, Christian. / Cross-cultural differences in academic self-efficacy and its sources across socialization contexts. In: Social Psychology of Education. 2021.

BibTeX

@article{e6bb19eca7d44663845d1132d842895e,
title = "Cross-cultural differences in academic self-efficacy and its sources across socialization contexts",
abstract = "This study investigated how as reported by Bandura (Self-efficacy: The exercise of control Freeman, 1997) sources of self-efficacy differ across socialization contexts for German students with diverse immigrant backgrounds. We measured all four sources of academic self-efficacy in three socialization contexts for students of former Soviet Union and Turkish descent as well as without an immigrant background, assuming that we would find differences between these groups. Participants were 1217 seventh-grade students in Germany. Multigroup structural equation analyses with latent variables revealed the differential importance of socialization contexts for the relation between academic self-efficacy and its sources across groups. For students of former Soviet Union and Turkish descent, verbal or social persuasion is the strongest contributing factor for academic self-efficacy, whereas for students without an immigrant background, it is mastery experience. In the school context, significant relationships between sources of self-efficacy and academic self-efficacy could only be observed for students without an immigrant background. The results both support and refine Bandura{\textquoteright}s social cognitive theory by showing that self-related constructs function differently in students with culturally diverse immigrant backgrounds.",
keywords = "Immigrant backgrounds, Socialization contexts, Sources of self-efficacy, Student academic self-efficacy, Social cognitive theory",
author = "Gebauer, {Miriam M.} and Nele McElvany and Olaf Koeller and Christian Schoeber",
year = "2021",
month = sep,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1007/s11218-021-09658-3",
language = "English",
journal = "Social Psychology of Education",
issn = "1381-2890",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cross-cultural differences in academic self-efficacy and its sources across socialization contexts

AU - Gebauer, Miriam M.

AU - McElvany, Nele

AU - Koeller, Olaf

AU - Schoeber, Christian

PY - 2021/9/2

Y1 - 2021/9/2

N2 - This study investigated how as reported by Bandura (Self-efficacy: The exercise of control Freeman, 1997) sources of self-efficacy differ across socialization contexts for German students with diverse immigrant backgrounds. We measured all four sources of academic self-efficacy in three socialization contexts for students of former Soviet Union and Turkish descent as well as without an immigrant background, assuming that we would find differences between these groups. Participants were 1217 seventh-grade students in Germany. Multigroup structural equation analyses with latent variables revealed the differential importance of socialization contexts for the relation between academic self-efficacy and its sources across groups. For students of former Soviet Union and Turkish descent, verbal or social persuasion is the strongest contributing factor for academic self-efficacy, whereas for students without an immigrant background, it is mastery experience. In the school context, significant relationships between sources of self-efficacy and academic self-efficacy could only be observed for students without an immigrant background. The results both support and refine Bandura’s social cognitive theory by showing that self-related constructs function differently in students with culturally diverse immigrant backgrounds.

AB - This study investigated how as reported by Bandura (Self-efficacy: The exercise of control Freeman, 1997) sources of self-efficacy differ across socialization contexts for German students with diverse immigrant backgrounds. We measured all four sources of academic self-efficacy in three socialization contexts for students of former Soviet Union and Turkish descent as well as without an immigrant background, assuming that we would find differences between these groups. Participants were 1217 seventh-grade students in Germany. Multigroup structural equation analyses with latent variables revealed the differential importance of socialization contexts for the relation between academic self-efficacy and its sources across groups. For students of former Soviet Union and Turkish descent, verbal or social persuasion is the strongest contributing factor for academic self-efficacy, whereas for students without an immigrant background, it is mastery experience. In the school context, significant relationships between sources of self-efficacy and academic self-efficacy could only be observed for students without an immigrant background. The results both support and refine Bandura’s social cognitive theory by showing that self-related constructs function differently in students with culturally diverse immigrant backgrounds.

KW - Immigrant backgrounds

KW - Socialization contexts

KW - Sources of self-efficacy

KW - Student academic self-efficacy

KW - Social cognitive theory

U2 - 10.1007/s11218-021-09658-3

DO - 10.1007/s11218-021-09658-3

M3 - Journal article

JO - Social Psychology of Education

JF - Social Psychology of Education

SN - 1381-2890

ER -

ID: 1682311